G-Lab Deep

Sep. 01, 2009 to Feb. 29, 2012

Deepening G-Lab for Cross-Layer Composition


G-Lab Deep is one of the 2nd wave G-Lab projects funded by the German BMBF (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Federal Ministry of Education and Research) and runs until February 2012.

The project addresses issues related to the Future Internet and the provisioning of appropriate experimental platforms in the academic environment, with an emphasis on current work in the G-Lab framework. The main focus of the research is to convey the requirements that result from a concrete application layer workflow to the network layer.

The same questions and problems arise in both the application layer and the network itself such as, for example, problems related to the description, location and functional composition of service units. Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) concepts are relevant to all levels, yet various different approaches and technologies are used. These approaches require extended flexibility in the network protocol stack. Revolutionary approaches that are tailored for current research are needed here. There is already a great deal of flexibility in the applications field, and as a result new compositional approaches are easier to implement. This is why researchers follow a more evolutionary approach.

This project will attempt to bring both worlds closer together and to produce and set up suitable cross layer, cross technology and cross domain results. In addition, it is vital to set up monitoring and security mechanisms that extend across all layers for decision making and network control as well as for examining suitable management and implementation mechanisms. Refining the current G-Lab experimental platform is also an essential aspect of this project and will help to ensure the position of future experimental research as part of the overall G-Lab framework.

NGNI is especially addressing cross-layer service brokerage and monitoring aspects as well as cross-domain federation issues as part of this project.